Back to School Connection

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Connected.”

 

Starting out in the world as a first-grader can be frightening, but not in Germany. Parents help their children make the transition from kindergarten to primary school more enticing. They give them a “schultuete” or school cone. The large cone is decorated and filled with candy and gifts.

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Candy Cone

Ceramics and Photo Styling of the Schultuete by Tresa Meyer Clark

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A Little History
My Oma (Grandma in German) gave me a photograph of my Dad on his first day of primary school, holding his schultuete, in Hamburg, Germany in the 1940’s.

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School Candy Cone

Hamburg, Germany

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The expression on his face is priceless. That photo inspired me to create a collage, and a ceramic piece, as pictured above in a shadow box display. Spending creative time to stylize all the German items my Grandparents saved over the years is one of my favorite ways to decorate. As a graphic artist, combining old hand-written letters from Europe and postcard memorabilia helps me to connect the past to the present in a collage.
A way to capture the light, or bring the old stuff up from the basement storage and make it meaningful again.

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the water and boats in Germany

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first grade, photo, 1960's, retouched, back to school, school portrait, tresa meyer clark

Tresa Meyer

Just for giggles, here is my first-grade portrait. I took the time today to retouch it for spots and crinkles. Obviously my parents had great sense of style. ( :

~~~Tresa

 

August Treasures

Say hello to August and the birthstone Peridot.

Imagine a beach that sparkles with the crystals of Peridot. On the Island of Oahu, it is so very treasured, that the people have illuminated many beaches by adding tiny grains of light green crystals.

SilverRushStyle

Photo by SilverRushStyle on Etsy

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A Little History

Miners have found Peridot in volcanic rocks and even meteors that landed on Earth. It is the only gemstone that comes in one color, and is not heat-treated to alter the color, as many gemstones are. Because it is sensitive to fast changes in temperature, it is not advisable to clean Peridot with an ultrasonic method.

Since 1500 B.C. valuable Peridot was mined near Egypt, on St. Johns Island, in the Red Sea. However, it was nearly depleted up to the time WW1 began. Later, it became more abundant in 1994 after a mine was discovered in Pakistan, west of the Himalayan Mountains. Today, in Arizona, 90% of the worlds Peridot comes from the San Carlos Apache Reservation, a very large source, which is mined only by the Apache Indians.

Peridot can be found in museums all over the world, with the largest on display at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., containing 310 carats. The second largest documented display is the Shrine of the Magi with 200 carats. It is located in the Dom, a Gothic Cathedral in Cologne, Germany. In 1988, I viewed the breathtaking shrine which is a reliquary for the Wise Men or Three Kings who visited the birth of Jesus.

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Magi in Cologne

Shrine of the Magi, Cologne, Germany

Traveling in Europe left a big impression on me, it was amazing and unforgettable. For me, it is easier to understand and remember history when art plays an important role in our world.

Interested in learning more about birthstones and fun factoids? Great! Next month it’s all about the amazing blue Sapphire.

~~~Tresa

 

Research from www.vivalachi.com